QUARTERLY ESSAY 57 DEAR LIFE ON CARING FOR THE ELDERLY BY KAREN HITCHCOCK

It makes you ask questions about your life, what you can give, how you give it and more importantly what and how you take from others. Karen Hitchcock writes persuasively the personal and professional experience of a staff doctor in a city public hospital. I enjoyed this examination of the issues around health care for the elderly, written from a medical doctor’s perspective. Our collective delusion is that we can have all the benefits such a society would bring without the structural supports necessary to bring it into being, that we can attain health by inventing and buying drugs. There is so much on this book to think about. Although this is written in an Australian context, we are influenced by practices in the US, UK and Canada so this is essential reading for people from those places too

Description In this moving and controversial Quarterly Essay, doctor and writer Karen Hitchcock investigates the treatment of the elderly and dying through some unforgettable cases. Doctors may declare a situation hopeless when it may not be so. Many general medical units where they exist are overstretched, underfunded and caring for far too many patients with a skeleton staff. Instead, I have bought copies of this essay for my daughters who might have to make choices when I’m not able to. Shopping cart Show cart. Cardiologists, respiratory physicians, neurologists, nephrologists and endocrinologists gradually replaced the generalist physician. It horrifies me me that institutional ageism is so rife in the care of our oldest citizens, that people are denied treatment purely because of their age and so on.

Add a alert Enter prices below and click ‘Add’. It seems unlike in countries such as Japan, we haven’t as yet spent the necessary time and effort attempting to answer many of the difficult and important questions that surround the final years of our lives, nor have decided to invest the necessary time, money, and resources needed to ensure a meaningful old age and one free of isolation for our most fragile.

Nursing homes are where we place our bad outcomes, our frail, our no-longer-independents. By the time of my residency, the old generalists had retired and many general medicine units filled rosters by cutting deals with specialists: By logging in you agree to our Terms of service and Privacy policy.

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To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. And then reminds us that we too will one day be the elderly. As much as our natural instinct may be to avert our gaze from death, to push it from our minds at every opportunity, this essay is inspirational and aspirational in its scope. She traverses the terrain between love, empathy and pragmatism deftly but without an ounce of dismissal.

Dec 27, Jennifer rated it it was amazing Shelves: Apr 01, Bonnie rated it it was amazing.

Dear Life: On Caring for the Elderly: Quarterly Essay 57 by Karen Hitchcock ·

If you’re hitchcoock existing print subscriber, and you have never logged in, you may need to activate your Schwartz Media account. Here’s hoping that we will become much more compassionate as a society and provide our seniors with a meaningful, fulfilling life until it is truly time for them to go. Many suffer delirium as a consequence of infection or pain, or simply from being moved from their usual surrounds. Sep 19, Dylan rated it it was amazing.

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Account Options Sign in. The intimacy of death means it can never be reduced to a few variables on an app to decide who should receive what sort elverly medical treatment and an ageing population requires society to change if the old are to be treated with dignity and society enriched by their contribution instead of shamed by the m As ever Karen Hitchcock delivers a thoughtful and thought provoking insight into care for the elderly, end of life care and dying, things we must all face ourselves professionally and personally.

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quarterly essay 57 dear life on caring for the elderly by karen hitchcock

Tw rated it liked it Jul 22, It horrifies me me that institutional ageism is so rife in the care of our oldest citizens, that people are denied treatment purely because of their age and so on.

With honesty and deep experience, she looks at end-of-life decisions, frailty and dementia, over-treatment and escalating costs. But what if you come with two or three or four organs failing, and can no longer negotiate your stairs to go and buy food?

  PROBLEM SOLVING EAT BULAGA JULY 16 2015

Ours is a society in which ageism, often disguised, threatens to turn the elderly into a ‘burden’ – difficult, hopeless, expensive and homogenous.

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We must plan for a future when more of us will be old, Hitchcock argues, with the aim of making that time better, not shorter. Ours is a society in which ageism, often disguised, threatens to turn the elderly into a ‘burden’ — difficult, hopeless, expensive essat homogenous.

Other books in the series. When did caring for them move from being our privilege to a burden?

She is very persuasive that very often patient choices are not choices at all, that we are ‘guided’ down a “least cost” path to see ourselves as burdensome so that we convince ourselves, against or preferred wishes, that we should take the death-hastening path.

At the time, I wanted to be a doctor so I could become a Freudian psychoanalyst. They are not a growing cost to be managed or a burden to be shifted or a horror to be hidden away, but people whose needs require us to change. Quarterly Essay 1 – 10 of 75 books. Karen Hitchcock’s exoerience fear a GP working with the elderly gives rhe many stories to tell, of old essayy she has loved her grandmothersome who have feared death and wanted quraterly fight against it, some who have been treated dismissively by doctors but by fortuitous humane intervention have gone on to live happily for years longer, and some who have felt useless and wanted to die due to social pressures.

If you’re an existing print subscriber, and you have never logged in, you may need to activate your Schwartz Media account. It’s idealistic, but it’s good to be, compared with current practice, I think

quarterly essay 57 dear life on caring for the elderly by karen hitchcock